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Below is a recounting of various car events I've attended along the years, from car club meets, autocrosses, track events, and enthusiast drives.

Table of Content for cars:

More pages: June 2020 March 2020 February 2020 December 2019 October 2019 September 2019 July 2019 June 2019 May 2019 March 2019 February 2019 November 2018 October 2018 September 2018 July 2018 June 2018 May 2018 April 2018 December 2017 October 2017 September 2017 July 2017 June 2017 May 2017 April 2017 March 2017 December 2016 November 2016 October 2016 September 2016 July 2016 June 2016 April 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 November 2014 September 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 February 2014 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 October 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 September 2011 July 2011 June 2011 April 2011 March 2011 October 2010 August 2010 July 2010 April 2010 February 2010 November 2009 October 2009 September 2009 June 2009 May 2009 April 2009 November 2008 May 2008 April 2008 December 2007 November 2007 October 2007 June 2007 April 2007 December 2006 November 2006 May 2006 January 2006 July 2005 May 2005 April 2005 January 2005 December 2004 October 2004 September 2004 August 2004 July 2004 June 2004 May 2004 February 2004 October 2003 May 2003 April 2003 March 2003 November 2002 October 2002 July 2002 May 2002 April 2002 March 2002 October 2001 September 2001 August 2001 July 2001 June 2001 May 2001 April 2001 March 2001 February 2001 December 2000 November 2000 October 2000 September 2000 August 2000 July 2000




2020/06/14 First Covid-19 Track Day at Laguna Seca with the 650S
π 2020-06-14 01:01 in Cars
I ended up doing one of the last track days before everything shut down for Covid-19, and I was able to get a spot for one of the first track days after Laguna Seca re-opened. It was with speed ventures, and they nicely allowed me to buy 2 rungroups, so I had a pretty packed day for the single day I went, Sunday.

I was not able to get my racecar back, as it was up for sale, so I had to take the Mclaren.

Unfortunately, McLaren had an issue on my service that week (they were a bit overwhelmed, and I'm sure difficult conditions), and they did not fix an undertightened leaky valve, which forced me to stop twice during the drive there to add air as my tire was getting empty. I arrived there, uncertain that I'd be able to drive.

made it with a bit of air in my tires
made it with a bit of air in my tires


with Covid-19, no drivers meeting
with Covid-19, no drivers meeting

everyone had masks and we mostly kept social distancing
everyone had masks and we mostly kept social distancing







a couple of teslas were there, that's dedication
a couple of teslas were there, that's dedication


It had been a while since my car saw the track:



as always, the car was wasting my time with alerts when the tires were fine.
as always, the car was wasting my time with alerts when the tires were fine.

that said, one lap my valve failed and I lost almost all my air, barely made it out
that said, one lap my valve failed and I lost almost all my air, barely made it out

turns out all it was, was a valve that was never tightened right
turns out all it was, was a valve that was never tightened right

Thanks a lot to BR Racing for helping me with my car when the valve of my tire popped out and I lost almost all my air. Thanks to their help, I was able to get back on track, but by then, my tires had lost their grip, and my brakes had sadly also gotten a lot more worn than they should have.

All in all, it was a bit vexing, I started with 1:39's in the morning with my tire issues and my not remembering the track much, and as the day went by and the track and my tires got slower, I got faster and finished with the same 1:39 until my tires and brakes gave out.

the front sensors melted and went to metal without any warning, as usual
the front sensors melted and went to metal without any warning, as usual

rear brakes were not happy
rear brakes were not happy

Oh yeah, and I got a reminder that my Mclaren is not as stable and planted as my racecar, along with cresting a small hill, getting the car light, not having the wheel completely straight, a bit of coolant on the track left by the previous car, and my using too much of the track with differential grip between the track and the runble strip, didn't work out indeed (jump to 11:45):

2020/03/06 Fast Toys Club at Laguna Seca, 105db
π 2020-03-06 01:01 in Cars
Thanks to my friend Justice, I learned about this track day, which ended up getting few cars. I was able to attend with my F458C, maybe the last time I get to drive it since I'm looking at selling it, given that I just don't do track driving enough to be worth owning my own racecar. It was a bit bittersweet, but I was able to get a few 1:31 times. Unfortunately, by the time I put fresh tires, the track got warmer, and my times went up instead of down. I know I could have had 1:29 early in the morning, but never got to actually do it, oh well.

The plan is that I'll be able to rent from Fast Toys Club in the future:

ideally that's the one of the cars I'll be able to rent/drive after selling mine
ideally that's the one of the cars I'll be able to rent/drive after selling mine

After a quick drivers' meeting, it was time to go on track:




Lots of Mclarens:










Justice took his SVJ, beautiful car:





Ken came with my car and gave me support during the day:


a few pictures for posterity
a few pictures for posterity



I had a bit of extra fun by taking my Tesla around the track for a few laps. It was of course slower, I boiled the brake fluid in a single lap, but it was fun :)


I had fun, despite my times getting worse throughout the day as the track got warmer. In the afternoon, all the rungroups merged, so it was interesting, but it worked out pretty well.
Thanks to Fast Toys Club for the good day.

2020/03/06 4 laps with my Model 3 at Laguna Seca, 2 1.55 laps with toasted brakes
π 2020-03-06 01:01 in Cars
Since I was at Laguna Seca with my racecar and I had driven in the Model 3 (AWD LR, but not performance, 18" aero wheels), I figured I'd try the Tesla for a few laps. I should have planned this better and re-read my friend Matt Crowley's report when he tried that in his car a while back. Also, I didn't know Matt spent $3500 fixing his brakes after the day. This probably would have talked me out of trying :)

trying to get some charge from the 50A/220V plug I found.
trying to get some charge from the 50A/220V plug I found.


Laguna unplugged me soon thereafter and put a nice note that such power was worth $700 + 40% surcharge, how nice of them, over $1000 for $4's worth of electricity.

ready, all you need is stickers, right? (they fit nicely on top of the mud I got driving in the snow in tahoe)
ready, all you need is stickers, right? (they fit nicely on top of the mud I got driving in the snow in tahoe)

Anyway, given that ignorance is bliss, I went out with all my crap in the car, I figured removing it wouldn't change much anyway, and planned on doing only 3 laps so as not to thoroughly destroy the brakes. I did manage to hit 119 mph on my 2nd lap, and that was just when the brakes started not working due to overheating. Stopping in turn 2 was going to be "fun" (I made it though).
After 2 laps and boiled brake fluid, but also having passed a lamborghini and a porsche on the outside of the corkscrew, and being blackflagged for it :) I figured I'd call it a day. My 2nd lap (which was far from clean) was 1:56.

Those were not fast drivers, but it was cool to pass a few of them:

I passed several cars on the outside after the corkscrew in my ferrari, but got one in my tesla too :)
I passed several cars on the outside after the corkscrew in my ferrari, but got one in my tesla too :)

Sorry to the driver, I must have scared him a bit, he likely never saw/heard me until 'WTF is that car doing here'
Sorry to the driver, I must have scared him a bit, he likely never saw/heard me until 'WTF is that car doing here'

And then there was the lambo I passed fair and square :)
And then there was the lambo I passed fair and square :)

wee!
wee!

Here is the first "session": (really 2 full laps and then I got black flagged for passing the porsche and scaring it). I passed the porsche at 3:40 and the lambo at 5:00

I came back for 2 more laps later in the afternoon when the track was warmer, my tires still over inflated, and my brake fluid still boiled (no firm pedal), and I got 2 laps of 1:55. I didn't commit for more speed in the straights because honestly I didn't know that car would stop and I didn't really want to completely destroy my braking hardware. Had done my first lap right, now knowing how to drive that car, I should have been able to get a single lap at 1:50 before the brakes gave up.

4 laps, 13 miles, 35% battery used
4 laps, 13 miles, 35% battery used

Two cleaner laps at 1:55 each, obviously not that fast, but my brake fluid was alrady boiled, my tires were likely too inflated (55psi) and the track was already 3-4 seconds slower than it was in the morning when I started I wonder how much faster the car could have been (I was already 10 mph slower before 2 due to the lack of brakes):

Looks like a full battery would have given 36 miles and 12 laps or so. This makes me question the wisdom of going through the work of tracking a tesla with proper brakes and tires. 12 laps is not a lot, and if you don't have a supercharger nearby (which is still 1h charge), that's not a lot of laps.

Overheating stuff, made other stuff unhappy :)
Overheating stuff, made other stuff unhappy :)

1.5Kw/mile, it's 1.5H of my house's power used in a single mile
1.5Kw/mile, it's 1.5H of my house's power used in a single mile

On the plus side, despite all the errors I got, the car recovered when it cooled down, and even the brake fluid got back in a state that my brakes work somewhat. Not as well as before, but enough to stop the car :)
At least I didn't ran the pads down to the backing plates while destroying the rotors. That said, it's still amazing how a single lap at laguna seca can overheat stock breaks and boil brake fluid (which is exactly what happened in my case).

This was stupid, but it was fun. For comparison I did some 1:31's in my Ferrari F458 Challenge GT3 that morning on used tires. Looks like a stock Model 3 Performance with proper tires and brakes, can go 10 seconds faster than my 1:55's, not bad!


Thanks to Fast Toys Club for the great track day, the report on the day in my F458C is here
2020/02/15 Ice Force+ with Porsche Ice Experience at Circuit Mecaglisse
π 2020-02-15 01:01 in Cars
After last year's Porsche Ice Experience Driving Course at Circuit Mecaglisse, I had to go back for level 3, Ice Force+ (+ gives an extra 4th day to practise more track lapping, and was well worth it).


Here's a marketing video:


Just like last year, we stayed at Esterel Resort

when not going racing on ice, there isn't much else to do but ice skating and snowmobiling
when not going racing on ice, there isn't much else to do but ice skating and snowmobiling

We met most of our time there having dinners after a long day of driving
We met most of our time there having dinners after a long day of driving


The first morning, we had a short class on car dynamics:



how controlled sliding through an icy turn is the quickest way compared to the sticky track line which doesn't work
how controlled sliding through an icy turn is the quickest way compared to the sticky track line which doesn't work

the most fun you can have, driving 90 degrees or more from the direction of travel
the most fun you can have, driving 90 degrees or more from the direction of travel

Every day, we then took a 40mn bus from Esterel to Circuit Mecaglisse, which is in the middle of nowhere:



we then got to meet our cars
we then got to meet our cars





we drove 992s and 991 Turbos
we drove 992s and 991 Turbos

someone, drove our car at 262kph, I don't think it was us :)
someone, drove our car at 262kph, I don't think it was us :)

we had 3mm studs for god like traction on ice
we had 3mm studs for god like traction on ice

Kees, our instructor, introducing the cars to us, with our assistant, Emilie
Kees, our instructor, introducing the cars to us, with our assistant, Emilie

The big whiteboard on the ground made it easy to write instructions
The big whiteboard on the ground made it easy to write instructions

By luck, I got paired with the best student in the group, Mathieu, so he doubled as my instructor :)



Kees, showing us how to do a scandinavian flick around a corner with a set of cars showing a snapshot of the line
Kees, showing us how to do a scandinavian flick around a corner with a set of cars showing a snapshot of the line


Our assistants worked hard for us :)



but more seriously, they kept us on track, and cleaned our cars of all the snow we shoved into them. Poor Emily got her wooden spoon broken by all our snow
but more seriously, they kept us on track, and cleaned our cars of all the snow we shoved into them. Poor Emily got her wooden spoon broken by all our snow

Here are a few nice pictures from our professional photographer:

driving sideways with the wheels straight
driving sideways with the wheels straight




this is why the cars had snow stuck everywhere :)
this is why the cars had snow stuck everywhere :)

we often helpded make the track a bit wider :)
we often helpded make the track a bit wider :)


yes, this is fun :)
yes, this is fun :)

I did my part helping clean the loose snow at the edge of the track :)
I did my part helping clean the loose snow at the edge of the track :)

I might have done this too :)
I might have done this too :)

Here are a few videos, 3 way snow drifting:

And videos of my crashing in snow banks in different ways :)

Thanks to all the instructors, also to Porsche for letting us drive their cars and make mistakes, and the great codrivers in our group (blue group was still #1 !) :)

After the program was over, we had a celebration dinner and prices for the best drivers:


Mathieu, my co-driver, won the price for best driver in our group
Mathieu, my co-driver, won the price for best driver in our group

This was so much fun, there are no higher levels, but I'm quite tempted to go back :)

2019/12/01 Using a Tesla Model 3 as Emergency Power Source In Case of Grid Failure
π 2019-12-01 01:01 in Cars, Electronics
Iwas interested in getting a decent amount of amps from my car while it's parked at home if I'm in a power emergency situation (i.e. no power) for maybe 2-3 days (as sadly is now a new "normal" in california).

I knew that this could void the warranty on some parts of the car. I was ok with that. Tesla wants me to buy a powerwall, but I think powerwalls are stupid.

I'd need to spend $30 to $40K in powerwalls to get the same amount of energy I already have in my car and I already paid for. Sorry, but I'm not spending that much for something I may need once every few years. Load shifting my solar in california is otherwise a straight loss, and PG&E forces some silly rules about not allow using powerwalls for time of use power arbitration if you accept the buying credit for them. You get penalized for helping take the peaks off the grid, yeah bureaucracy!
If tesla sold a powerwall that would allow using your car as a battery source for emergencies only (car batteries are not designed for daily cycling like powerwalls), I'd be super interested, but they do not, so I decided to make my own answer.

I knew that I could probably only get 2-3000W out of my car, honestly for emergency use (a couple of fridges and essential equipment), that's good enough. Sure, it wouldn't power all my house lights, or even my furnace for heating (which happens to use over 1000W just to run the fans), but eh, it's for emergency use only, so good enough.

Plugging into the standby 12V battery

What I knew from the beginning is that the battery in the car is way too small to power a proper size inverter (I have a 3000W one to be safe but honestly I only plan on using 1000W peak for my fridge and an average of 200W otherwise when the fridge is on). What I didn't know is that the Model 3 only provides trickle charge power to the battery, enough to charge it for normal use in the car, but not enough to recharge it if you plug a reasonable inverter into it (it will discharge quicker than it can recharge).

My plan was to connect a big GLA 12V battery in parallel with the car's battery, so that it could absorb big peaks and buffer a it longer in case the car's battery recharge didn't kick in quickly enough. I did however confirm that the car's DC-DC system only recharges the standby battery at a slow rate, so it was not adequate for my need.

Plugging into the cigarette lighter adapter

For some uses, it would work to use some DC-DC charging system to recharge a big 12V battery external to the car and try to keep the car awake as much as possible so that the 12V CLA port stays on. The only issue with that plan is that you can only get about 12A sustained from it, so if you are planning on using over 100W average, this will not work in the end. In my case, my fridge was more in the 200W range.

Tapping into the car's DC-DC system

This is where things get interesting. The car's battery pack is in the 400V range, and 400V DC will definitely kill you (DC is actually worse than AC), so don't even think about messing with that unless you are truly a trained professional.
For the rest of us, what you need to know is that the car has a DC-DC converter that turns 400V into 14V DC. This is used to power the car's systems when it's not sleeping, as well as recharge the small 12V battery that keeps things alive when the car is asleep. The idea is to tap directly into that 12V system which I'm told can provide up to 200A/2000W (which converted to 120V is really only 20A). A few things to note:
  • The 12V tap is available under the rear seats which you can remove by pushing to clips sideways
  • Connecting to ground is easy, connecting to the 12V pole is a bit more tricky. It's best to leave the current cable in there as it needs a perfect connection to conduct all the amps it's meant to carry. You can however add a 2nd connector on top of it an add a second nut on top (the bolt it long enough for this, and it seems to be purposely so)
  • If the DC-DC senses a short, it will shut down to protect itself. This is good, but also bad. The problem is that after it shuts down, it doesn't reset easily, or at all. Once it's shutdown, your standby 12V battery will discharge without being recharged, until it dies. You can recharge it with a 12V battery charger, but obviously this is only a temporary measure
  • If your DC-DC converter does not reset, you need to disconnect the 12V battery entirely, causing the entire car to shudown and reset. When I did that, my DC-DC converter came back online
  • Where it gets interesting, is that inverters come with a big capacitor to allow for transient loads. Those capacitors will take almost infinite energy when you connect them, causing a big spark, and looking like a short, causing the very undesirable shutdown explained above.
  • The solution is to wire a big resistor in front of your inverter so that it can charge its capacitor slowly
  • Then add a 200A relay to bypass the resistor when the inverter is 'charged'. The relay can be powered by connecting it to the inverter itself on the 12V side, making it so that when the capacitor is charged, the voltage across the inverter poles is high enough to actuate the relay and bypass the resistor.
  • The 2 white holes are where the clips that you need to release. are located. You can also see the black and red tap points:


    Building it up

    I used this:
  • 2000W pure sine wave inverter: https://www.amazon.com/SUDOKEJI-Inverter-2000W-Display-Outlets/dp/B07RWHN22W
  • 3000W NOT pure sine wave (cheaper and probably good enough for most loads): https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07FK3M6BB
  • 200A 12V relay: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01MYPTVJD
  • 150 Ohm 25W resistor: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07C1VGNFF
  • Optional 200A hall sensor meter: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07D35MFBQ
  • Originally I tried those:

  • 100W 1.8Ohm: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01N0XZN1F/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 (resistor was too small and the inverter charged too quickly, tripping the DC-DC conerter)
  • Optional 100A energy meter: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B013PKYILS/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
  • What happens is:

  • battery gets connected or DC-DC system turns on
  • resistor limits current and starts charging the capacitor in the inverter, slowly bringing the voltage across its poles from 0V to 12V
  • voltage across the inverter starts rising until 10V or whatever
  • once it's enough, the relay is energized and bypasses the resistor
  • now 200A can go to the inverter and no spark/current inrush was created, and your DC-DC converter doesn't shutdown when it turns on
  • This shows the current meter shunt connected to the bypass relay (which is powered by the connectors on the inverter side). You then see the thick 100W resistor connected in parallel with the relay. This allows current to flow more slowly and ramp up the connection:




    I tested a 1300W microwave which worked without issues, so did my fridge and other devices. The pure sine wave inverter is very important for a microwave, but a cheaper inverter worked well enough for my fridge and basic loads.

    Since we're talking about currents of 100A or more, we need to talk about wire gauge. The inverter I got came with 10AWG cables of about 1m. These cables are insufficient for 100A (never mind 200A), but in real life will mostly work for short distances and as long as you don't use the full power continuously (which could technically heat up the cable enough to melt its insulation and cause a short eventually). In my tests with 100A, I lost 0.7V due to inadequate wiring:

  • 0.25V lost in each of the two 10AWG cables (good quality)
  • Extra wire from relay to inverter lost 0.06V
  • 200A relay only lost 0.06V
  • 100A shunt for power meter lost 0.1V (and gets warm)
  • Given that the car outputs 13.5 to 14V, this drop is not big enough to matter since the inverter works all the way down to 10V or so, but be mindful of potential heat. Here is the end result:



    Keeping the DC-DC system awake

    One thing that you still need, it to keep the car from going to sleep if you want the DC-DC converter to stay on. Thankfully a recent software update added camper mode. You can just go in the climate screen/fan icon, set the car in park, and set 'keep climate on' to 'Camp', turn off AC and set the temperature to something low in order to save batteries (i.e. not waste the batteries into climate control).
    If you know of a more battery efficient way to keep the DC-DC system on without having to run climate or even having the control screens on, let me know (contact Email link at the bottom of this page). Hell, if you build one and get it working, shoot me an Email too :)

    Backfeeding your house

    If you really know what you're doing, you could use this with a custom made male-male outlet, to backfeed one or both phases of your house (it won't power anything 240V of course). The advantage is that you don't have to run extension cords and power existing lights in your house. If you do this, you must carefully disconnect utility power so that you don't backfeed the grid, as well as potential solar panels that could decide to sync with your inverter and feed more power than you're using, causing other issues you don't want to deal with. Of course, you'll find that 1000-3000W may not be enough power unless you do careful load shedding
    I'm not going to give more details because there is definite potential for things going wrong in many ways, but if you absolutely know what you're doing, there you go...

    Discussion Threads

    https://teslamotorsclub.com/tmc/threads/how-many-amps-can-you-get-from-the-12v-system-for-emergency-situations.178079/page-3#post-4371607 https://teslamotorsclub.com/tmc/threads/aftermarket-sub-woofer-amplifier-installation-using-dc-dc-12v-power-source.149582/page-2#post-4337510 https://teslamotorsclub.com/tmc/threads/master-thread-powering-house-or-other-things-with-model-3-12v-battery.140567/page-4#post-4371639
    2019/10/18 Louwman Car Museum in The Hague
    π 2019-10-18 01:01 in Cars
    Little did I know that 1H away from Amsterdam, The Hague has a world class car Museum, actually one of the best collections I've seen. I spent a few hours in Den Hagg to see other things, but Louwman Car Museum was where I spent the most time.

    The story is that a successful Dutch businessman started collecting cars, and eventually realized that he needed a better place to house them, so he built this extensive multiple building, multiple story museum to house them all. The collection is heavily weighed towards older rare cars:


    very old steam powered car
    very old steam powered car

    face to face sitting car, using candles for lights
    face to face sitting car, using candles for lights



    another very strange design, makes you wonder why it didn't catch on :)
    another very strange design, makes you wonder why it didn't catch on :)


    the controls look 'interesting'
    the controls look 'interesting'

    unusual steering control
    unusual steering control


    boat car, which apparently was a poor boat and a poor car
    boat car, which apparently was a poor boat and a poor car

    not a boat car, but pretending to be one
    not a boat car, but pretending to be one


    another steam car
    another steam car

    the first hybrid gas/electric car, some 90 years before the prius!
    the first hybrid gas/electric car, some 90 years before the prius!



    looks like every crazy thing has been tried
    looks like every crazy thing has been tried










    6 wheel drive formula 1!
    6 wheel drive formula 1!




    whoa!
    whoa!














    And after 4H, the visit was over, just as the museum was closing. It was definitely a museum that was one of a kind.

    See more images for Louwman Car Museum in The Hague
    2019/09/08 Fairbanks Fountainhead Antique Auto Museum
    π 2019-09-08 01:01 in Ak2019, Cars
    While in Fairbanks, I noticed that they had a car museum, so out of habit, I figured we should go check it out, not expecting much. Well, the joke was on me, it was a fantastic museum with very rare cars, several more than 100 years old, and including many I had never seen before, including one even that had a magnetic transmission and was a hybrid electric, over 100 years ago!

    doesn't look like too much from the outside, until you walk in
    doesn't look like too much from the outside, until you walk in




    The 1917 Owen Magnetic ar was a masterpiece. It used a gasoline engine to make electricity which turned a magnet which in turn created induction power and turned the wheels without needing any direct link or transmission. Genius! There are only 12 left in the world:





    And may other cars I hadn't seen yet:








    early open wheel racing
    early open wheel racing



    Are you complaining about your drives to the ski resort:


    they got you covered
    they got you covered

    that's also cute
    that's also cute

    this beats chains big time :)
    this beats chains big time :)

    More cars:








    this car looks like it was designed to have a mean face, back in 1912
    this car looks like it was designed to have a mean face, back in 1912





    mirror on top of the spare tire, interesting :)
    mirror on top of the spare tire, interesting :)








    There are more cars, some still being restored, but hopefully those give you an overview. If you'd like to see them all, see https://photos.app.goo.gl/7Bwc4wrCAJQitJ9W8

    2019/07/18 Golden Gate Porsche Club Track Day at Laguna Seca
    π 2019-07-18 01:01 in Cars
    It had been a while since I last went to Laguna Seca. I signed up for what was originally a 4 day event, but once I got the schedule (just a few days before the event), I realized I'd get very little track time (1h30 or less) and cancelled the last 2 days.
    Thankfully with Robb and the organizer's help, I was able to sign up for 2 rungroups the first day, and a slower rungroup the 2nd day where I drove my 650S.

    I got the F458 down to 1:32, and my instructor got it down to 1:30 on non fresh tires. With fresh tires when it's cool, it seems that it could do 1:26 or so. Interestingly I did feel the change in car power depending on the outside temperature.

    The 650S had very used tires, one had a tire patch for a nail hole, so I didn't expect a whole lot, but I got it down to 1:40 on one lap. Interestingly, while it had less grip for sure, the extra amount of power is very noticeable. I think with proper tires, I could easily get a 1:37 or better. Maybe one day :)



    Many cars in the paddocks:








    I drove in my 650S to use in a slower rungroup:



    Many tires:



    The place was overrun with ground squirrels:




    A few nice pictures:



    2019/06/10 Skyline to the Sea Loop
    π 2019-06-10 01:01 in Cars
    It has been so long since our last drive, I really needed that. It was fun despite my being a bit tired.











    See more images for Skyline to the Sea Loop
    2019/05/07 BBR Private Track Day at Thunderhill
    π 2019-05-07 01:01 in Cars
    A mere 6 days after Droid and Friends at Thunderhill, I was back for more with BBR and a small group.

    The other folks had already chartered a flight from Moffett, and given that I was tired and the weather was marginal VFR, I happily joined them:




    We had a handful of cars, which meant mostly clear track and little passing for me, leaving me to focus on improving my skills. Despite the day not being very warm, the track felt sticky and I didn't get that fast (I think I got as low as 1:51 (with bypass) after installing fresh tires). Still, I got to work on my technique, so it wasn't all for naught :)




    On the flight back, the pilot did a quick pass by TH, which I hadn't done myself in a while:





    Here's a single session until I spun:


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