Marc's Public Blog - Linux Home Automation


All | Aquariums | Arduino | Btrfs | Cars | Cats | Clubbing | Dining | Diving | Electronics | Exercising | Flying | Hiking | Linux | Linuxha | Museums | Public | Rc | Sciencemuseums | Snow | Solar | Trips



>>> Back to post index <<<

2011/08/03 Weather Monitoring with Oregon Scientific WMR968
π 2011-08-03 00:00 in Linuxha
A fair amount of people get weather info (wind, rain, and others) using 1-wire equipment, which is a pain both for having to run 1-wire to places outdoors (although I already was doing that), but more specifically because the mast the wind sensor is on is a lightening rod which has fried many people's home computers and networks.

The simplest way to avoid this problem is simply to go wireless so that lightening does not reach your inside computers and networks. As a side note, the WMR968, while far from perfect, is cheaper than 1-wire equivalent solutions (only $200). The equivalent functionality with 1-wire is about $500

The kit comes with solar panels that recharge your device batteries, so they're supposed to run forever (i.e. until they eventually die), and you get:

  • Indoor temp / humidity / baro pressure
  • Outdoor temp / humidity
  • Wind speed / direction
  • Rain gauge

  • wind sensor on the roof with the portable receiving console
    wind sensor on the roof with the portable receiving console

    rain sensor on top and hygro/temp sensor in the shade under the roof
    rain sensor on top and hygro/temp sensor in the shade under the roof


    little 'hack' to make the rain sensor more sensitive
    little 'hack' to make the rain sensor more sensitive

    The main thing that is nice with that kit outside of the fact that it's cheap, is that you can buy more receivers than there are in the kit (like multiple indoors BTHR receivers to get humidity in different rooms) and while the main console will not receive more than one, the rfxcom receiver I have plugged in my PC can receive as many as you can have (even your neighbours' :) ).
    This allows for having the console in the kitchen for instance, and not have to run a cable to your computer in the closet by having it use its own receiver with a bigger antenna and processing ability for many more devices (see list).

    Here is a link to all the WMR 968 graphs received from the rfxcom via XPL, with a couple of samples below:



    The only caveat is that it's a bit cheaply built, some of the outside sensors are not super water proof, so I slightly modified mine to make sure I had good water seals, and so far so good: can't beat the price and it hasn't failed for me yet :) Not having to climb on the roof to change batteries every so often is a nice bonus :)


    More pages: March 2004 March 2009 May 2009 August 2009 November 2009 December 2009 February 2010 March 2010 June 2010 August 2010 March 2011 July 2011 August 2011 November 2011 January 2013 November 2013 December 2013 July 2014

    >>> Back to post index <<<