Marc's Public Blog - Diving


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This is a collection of my blog entries and experiences with diving.
You can find all the pictures I've taken here, and read below for recountings of my more recent trips:

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2015/07/17 Diving Around Cocos Island with Argos
π 2015-07-17 00:00 in Diving
All the pictures below are geotagged, so you can click on them to see where they were taken

Cocos is interesting and different, starting with the fact that it requires a 36H trip each way to get there (no runways and too far to get via helicopter). We chose the Argos since it was part of the dive alliance, which contains the best boats in each location, and because they had a special research trip chartered by TIRN (Turtle Island Restoration Network) that was longer than usual (9 days of diving and 3 days travelling).

Cocos belongs to Costa Rica which we spent a week to visit before the diving trip.
It's a 36H boat trip away from Puntarenas:

We got the chance to get talks from Todd, Randall, and Brock about their efforts to save turtles and sharks from overfishing, fishing bycatch, and illegal shark fining. Brock, who volunteers/has volunteered at multiple such organizations, including Sea Shepherds, also joined us. They have been responsible for so much work to help sea life along the years that it was great to learn about it, even if much work still needs to be done. You can read more on the seaturtles.org, Pretoma, Sea Shepherd, and Fin Free sites.
I got a picture with them at the end of our trip:


They organized this trip to tag some sharks and turtles (to see their migration patterns and help keep zones fishing free to hopefully help curbing their clear decline) as well as take some tissue samples from some sharks.

We also did 2 submarine dives to 100 and 300 meters respectively, as explained on this page

Here is the map of what we dived (3 dives a day and just a few night dives):

Argos is a big converted boat with a crane to move skiffs and the submarine on and off the boat:


the inside was spacious enough
the inside was spacious enough



The crew kept us well fed :)



Of course, we were there to dive. Argos had some nice skiffs:



Cocos was full of sharks, and mostly fish that sharks don't eat, like lots of puffers, boxfishes, and porcupine fishes (they are all poisonous):
When these two have sex:


with those two:



You get this :)



porcupine fish
porcupine fish


this one actually looked pissed off :)
this one actually looked pissed off :)

boxfish
boxfish


this one is "hunting" by blowing on sand to look for things:

This shows sharks bumping into a poor puffer fish and confirming that they don't want to eat it:

Lots of eels, mostly moray eels that have an understanding with sharks, and don't get eaten either:




they always look mean, but this one genuinely seemed to be
they always look mean, but this one genuinely seemed to be

this one looked mellow
this one looked mellow

and had nice bloodshot eyes
and had nice bloodshot eyes

Plenty of other eels:





Same thing with triggerfish, some of which were quite colorful:



And same thing with rays too, from marble rays, eagle rays, and mobula rays, some were bigger than sharks:










whitetip sharks mating:

Interstingly, sharks didn't seem to eat flounder fish either:


Hell, they don't even eat lobster, they really go after the easy prey:

Lots of sharks, many many whitetip sharks:








this shark had an old tag
this shark had an old tag


Of course, there were plenty of hammerheads, but we're told not nearly as many as there used to be, unfortunately thanks to illegal shark finning, sadly a lot came from Taiwanese boats :(









Usually we got to see hammerheads at cleaning stations. Here, you can see the barberfish which act as cleaning fish. The hammerheads find them and swim in the middle of them:

Other sharks:

a tiger shark, those are huge and eat turtles amongst other things
a tiger shark, those are huge and eat turtles amongst other things

silvertip
silvertip

The night dives were 'interesting'. Sharks followed us to feed. That was impressive and sad for the fish being eaten:



This video shows the shark feeding, and it gets a bit insane. Poor little fish:

But we found some crabs and lobsters, and even a slipper lobster:






On a couple of dives, some wild dolphins came to check us out:





We got to see several huge schools of fish, mostly jacks:









Other misc fishes:











those fish change color from black to white
those fish change color from black to white


Also, some jelly fishes:


One day we went on the island for a short hike:


a collection of fishing hooks collected by the rangers
a collection of fishing hooks collected by the rangers

the coast to coast hike which unfortunately we were not allowed to do
the coast to coast hike which unfortunately we were not allowed to do



this bridge was made with confiscated fishing gear
this bridge was made with confiscated fishing gear





And here are a few pictures taken from the dive boats:




lots of small volcanic islands
lots of small volcanic islands

Of course, lots of birds, mostly boobies and frigate birds:








Unfortunately the location of our boat prevented viewing any sunsets, and I didn't catch any sunrise, so I got this:




Unfortunately, we didn't get to see any turtles, having over 63,000 turtles fished and killed per year just in Costa Rica waters, by long line fisheries (thousands of hooks on multi kilometer lines strung under water).
Also, what doesn't help either that tiger sharks have become more abundant in Cocos and like to eat turtles :(

But this was a great trip, 9 days of nice diving, plus 72 hours traversing to Cocos and back :)

But again, these ecosystems are vanishing fast. The amount of sharks that are being killed just for shark finning, is unbelievable, and the number of turtles and other sea animals thare being killed mistakenly just as bycatch for other seafood we eat, is a huge problem.
Please take a chance to learn more aobut these problems and spread the word, contribute, and/or donate:

  • seaturtles.org
  • Pretoma
  • Sea Shepherd
  • Fin Free
  • Racing Extinction
  • You can watch sharkwater here:


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